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with russia. a more powerful and emboldened china. an iran closer to a nuclear weapon, slark terrorists fans out across north america? simply put, under barack obama and hillary clinton, the u.s. has been unwilling to lead. and this has left a huge vacuum on the world stage. in a recent assessment of secretary clinton's tenure. michael owe o'hanlon of the brookings institute wrote even an admirers such as myself must admit few big problems were soflted on her watch. few big vic trises achieved. secretary clinton's work at the state department should be judged on whether she has left america's foreign policy in stronger or weaker position. most think the future lies with china than the u.s. it's not all mrs. clinton's fault. but the fact is we just don't have the influence we used to have around the world from syria to mali, we have led from behind, so in effect the former secretary of state has helped manage our decline in what looks increasingly like a post american world. and that's the memo. now on to the top story. another view on this, joining us now from new york, fox news contributor
. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. just like the meteor slamming into russia, elizabeth warren is already banging heads in the senate. >> the question i really want to ask is about how tough you are. >> we'll show you how the new sheriff of wall street is outclassing her fellow freshmen, and how the new cop on the beat means trouble for big banks. >>> ten years after george w. bush dragged the country into war in iraq, and explosive new documentary narrated by rachel maddow details the trail of deception like never before. rachel joins me to preview the film tonight. >>> plus, the big congressional panel on john boehner's decision to go on vacation before we go off another cliff. >>> it was the biggest meteor blast in 100 years. so how did we know about an asteroid the size of a swimming pool but not a meteorite the size of a house? good to have you with us tonight, folks. thanks for watching. progressives finally have something to be hopeful about when it comes to congress. now, the 113th congress kicked off in a pretty disappointing fashion. there could have been meaningful f
administration to have the dispute solved in a peaceful manner. prime minister abe is planning to visit russia before the end of the year to meet with the president. when he does another dispute, another issue will be on the agenda. russia control tgs islands and japan claims them. >> translator: this is an important year to build a new relationship. i hope it paves the way for abe's visit. >> mori delivered a letter from abe. putin said he, too, hoped for better things ahead. >> translator: i'm looking forward to meeting with prime minister abe. i hope it will lead to improved relations. >> mori and putin discussed a statement issued in 2001 when mori was prime minister. the statement reaffirmed the validity of the 1956 japan soviet joint declaration. the declaration states that russia will return two of the disputed islands to japan after a peace treaty is signed. officials never signed the treaty. still, mori and putin agreed they can't ignore the statement. putin says it's abnormal that the countries have no peace treaty. mori says japanese and russian leaders need to resolve the territori
gallery coincidence to there was this other daytime meteor in russia. so what we want to do is get out there and nudge it. you can do it by just slamming a rocket into it. at the planetary society, we do it by a flotilla, that would cause the surface to evaporate, nudge it off force, or you can go out there and just set it off, hoping that you're not going to screw it up and create a shower of these things which could be even worse. but we are the first generation of humans that can do something about it. so yes, a very scary day, but in a sense, an exciting day. and so right away, congressman lamar smith, from texas, a conservative said let's convene an asteroid meeting, we're all in. let's figure out what to do. >> i would like the asteroid meeting, i'm excited about the floating sun >> you can read more of my work at wonkblog.com. the "ed show" is up next. >>> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" from new york. meteors crashing into earth. congress goes on vacation again? and elizabeth warren is the new sheriff in town. all that and rachel maddow joins us tonight. b
of bipartisan consensus here at home. united states and russia accounts for the vast majority of the world's nuclear weapons with roughly 15,000 total warheads in the strategic-non- strategic basket. bilateral relations between the united states and russia are not what they have been in the most recent past. neither the united states nor russia faces issues were it requires them to be armed to the teeth were the effectiveness of each country's stock pile was proved to be prohibitively expensive. perhaps in past times, when the united states and russia targeted each other, the investment in maintaining the effectiveness of the stockpile was easily justified. discussion on the resize and content of the arsenal has been traditionally thought of in terms of threats, the size of the competing arsenal, geopolitical tensions, nato alliance security, etc. historically come a little consideration was given to funding the stockpile complex as there were general bipartisan and bicameral agreement in the intrinsic value of the nuclear arsenal strategically and as a deterrent. now, however, in the thir
. usaa. we know what it means to serve. the meteor to flew over and crashed into russia. more importantly, have you seen the meteor. the video is amazing, and so much of it caught on russian surveillance and russian dashboard cameras which are apparently a ton. russians love that. the thing weighed 20,000 pounds and was going at least 33,000 miles an hour. when the meteor hit and it's its associated shock wave hit, the ground shook, glass shattered, more than 1,000 people injured and more than 3,000 buildings were damaged. some what came to earth left a hole in a frozen lake 25 feet across. not a space rock crashing to earth this dramatically in more than 00 years in 1908 we did not have nearly the number of dashboard cameras we have now to watch it over and over and over and over again from a million different supercompelling angles, and, yet, less than 24 hours after the meteor won the prize for the most accidentally well documented astronomical event ever there, are already meteor truthers in russia. vladimir is a russian politician, and generally acknowledged a cookook. he has disting
into russia today. more importantly, you have seen the meteor. the video is amazing and there is so much of it caught on russian surveillance video, and dash cam videos, apparently there was a ton. russians love that. who knew, they say it was going at least 33,000 miles an hour. when the meteor hit and its associated shock wave hit, as well, the ground shook, glass shattered, more than a thousand people were injured and 3,000 buildings damaged. some of what was left, left a hole in the frozen lake. there has not been a spray rock crashing to earth anywhere near this dramatically in more than 100 years. back in 1908, the last time it happened this dramatically, we didn't have nearly the dashboard cameras to watch it happen as now, over and over again, from many, many different compelling angles. and yet, less than 20 hours after this meteor won the prize for the biggest disastrous meteor damage ever, he is acknowledged to be a koo k.but he has distinguished himself about this in russia, saying it was not a meteor that hit russia. the russian state-run media says that nothing ever falls t
in a proxy war supported by iran and russia. the other side of the debate is nothing else is working and we need to create pressure on assad and build relationship with people inside syria who might take over one day. another factor is there are rebels, al-qaeda affiliated rebels the united states and the west doesn't support. and i don't think it's in the west's interest to see them end up at the top of the heap. >> rose: and then we turn to the story of the chinese army spying on the american government and american companies with david sanger of the "new york times," dune lawrence and michael riley of bloomberg businessweek. >> the cyber has been off to the side as something of an annoyance. i'm hearing this has gotten so big it's moving to the center of the relationship and it risks the rest of the relationship. i think the next thing you're going to see the president sending some kind of envoy to beijing to make that point. >> rose: the conflict in syria and spying on the united states by the chinese army when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios
give the world some indication of how russia, china, the u.s., and essentially all major nations of the world to view the threat of a nuclear >> thank you, senator, for being here. and thank you for your military service. my single biggest concern about the nomination is the dramatic flip-flops between your past statements and record and what you are saying as a nominee. and they are about key, core issues. we have discussed some of those today. i want to focus on that, and i apologize if i go over some of the things that have come up before. i could not be here for most of the hearing. in 2006, when israel was responding to attacks by hezbollah from lebanon, you call that response, "a sickening slaughter." and you accuse israel of "the systematic destruction of an american friend, the people of and country of lebanon." what do you say about those statements?>> well, first, i said them. i have been asked about them. i have said that i regret saying that. it was within the larger context of a speech i made about what was going on, a thirtysomething days of war going on. i also inc
more members to draw closer to russia and even bring in as george bush did the former hud republics of the soviet union into this alliance and you wonder why the russians are upset about this and he lost his nerve on the things the country needed to do in terms of international agreements need to be a part of the accord and signed a comprehensive test ban treaty needed to be a part of the mines and the ban on the cluster bombs. we should have been a part of banning the use of teenagers in combat. over 100 nations have signed all of these pacts and if you look at the country that didn't, what we call the road nations in the united states saw them get to george bush and it's painful to talk about those eight years the fact that country reelected george bush doesn't say very much for any of us anywhere you boies edmondson use of intelligence on the war to a certain degree we certainly had it in the mexican war and the 1840's and the spanish-american war act. but in vietnam, the resolution was based on the misuse of intelligence. but you never had the systematic destruction of intellige
in russia, on the same day? fire up the conspiracy theories. >>> also -- i sit down with one of the hottest bands in the world, fun. >>> a government prepares for the apocalypse. >> canada will never become a safe haven for zombies ever. >>> and the dance that's everywhere, even here at cnn, the harlem shake. >>> just when you think we've got it all worked out, cutting-edge technology, scientific breakthroughs, miracle medicine, lately there's been talk about colonizing mars and many of you carry around a supercomputer right in your pocket. but just when you think you have it all worked out, the univers reminds us, we really don't. case in point, friday a chunk of space rock gets sucked in by the earth's gravitational pull. then streaks across the sky above russia. as it rockets through the atmosphere, friction heats the front of the rock a lot more than the back of it. the huge temperature difference is too much and essentially turns a meteor into a bomb. it explodes into a bunch of pieces. and what you're hearing here, that boom, boom, boom, is this -- take a look. those pieces are moving
of the cold war and more members from russia, even as george bush did, the former republic of the soviet union. into this alliance and you wonder why the russians are upset about that. and then finally clinton lost his nerve on things of this country needed to do in terms of international agreements. we need to be part of this be part of this ban on cluster bombs. all of the nations have signed these packs. it is what they call the rogue nations, and then we have the united states. then we get to george bush, and it is possible to talk about those eight years. the fact that this country reelected him does not say very much for any of us anywhere. always had misuse of intelligence to a certain degree. the mexican war in the 1840s, the spanish-american war. in vietnam as well. that was based on the misuse of intelligence. but you never had systematic distortion of intelligence the way that you had in the run-up to the iraqi war. you've never had someone tell the president it would be a slamdunk not help you make up your mind. but to help you convince the american people that we need to undertake
against a regime supported by iran and russia. on the other side of the debate the argument was well nothing else is working and we need to increase the pressure on assad and also build the relationship with the people inside syria who might take over one day. another factor is there are rebels jihaddists, al-qaeda rebels that the u.s. doesn't support. i don't want to see them at the top of the heap. >> rose: that's always the answer to the question people always ask. suppose you win what then. >> it's a good question. right now they're not winning. right now you have a situation where assad is pretty entrenched and the rebels are making gammons -- games but they don't seem to be decisive yet. >> rose: able to close the deal. >> not yet. so you're looking at a fairly drawn out conflict. one of the concerns people have is if the conflict is drawn out much longer, there won't be much left to hand over to oppose the assad regime. the whole mechanism and institutions of the state will have been destroyed. >> rose: let me make sure i understand. i have your piece in front of me and i
the classic sarah palin quote either. you can actually see russia from land here in alaska. that soon became i can see russia from my house thanks to tina fey. the list goes on. one moment and you become that guy or gal for the long haul. rubio's water break is now very much in the race. >>> up next, there hasn't been too much or this much momentum behind strengthening gun laws in two decades, but can president obama actually get something meaningful done? you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. all stations come over to mission a for a final go. this is for real this time. step seven point two one two. verify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. as your life and career change, fidelity is there for your personal economy, helping you readjust your retirement plan along the way. rethink how you're invested. and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today, a fidelity ira has a
country as ambassador to the u.n. russia, israel, india, el salvador among others. ambassador pickering is also a member of the council on foreign relations co-author with senator hagel of global zero report on u.s. nuclear policy. that came in for some tough detroitcriticism and you worked with senator chuck hagel. what kind of defense secretary do you think he would be? >> i think he would an superb defense secretary. he has made clear in these hearingshearings under difficult circumstances that he's mainstream and he supports what the president sports--supports. i think he has carefully calculated and honest views in how and what we should be proceeding in the world. we are part of it. we clearly need a defense second to none in this particular issue. but we also have to be thoughtful about how we move ahead. i think he's conscious as we all are of the fact that expenditures are going to go down in the days ahead and he will be called upon to make difficult judgments for the president. i have every confidence from my knowledge of him that he will give the president the correct and pr
meteor by the numbers. new revelations about just how powerful the fireball that hit russia was. facebook hacking. and horse meat outrage, details on all those stories throughout the hour. >>> but first -- new word today from president obama. he's taking on the gop on the right fiscal course for the country. he released his weekly radio address and says it's time to finish the job of cutting the deficit by the goal of $4 trillion. >> i disagree with republicans who think we should do that by making even bigger cuts to things like education and job training or medicare and social security benefits. that would force our senior citizens and working families to bear the burden of deficit reduction while the wealthiest are asked to do nothing more. that won't work. we can't just cut our way to prosperity. >> republicans aren't holding back in their gop address today. criticizing the president over the upcoming threat of sequestration. >> what the president failed to mention was that the sequester was his idea proposed by his administration during the debt limit negotiations in 2011. and now we
relationship changed and evolved with russia during the obama administration? what are the positives and negatives? guest: i think what has happened with russia, putin, who is the leader of russia, who came from the k.g.b., who came from the old soviet union, in my estimation is going back to his bad old ways. there was great hope for democracy in russia and nominally there are still elections and there's democracy but putin has consolidated power and has made it very difficult for democrats in russia to be able to have democratic government. and that's the big worry. and of course when you look at what russia has done and what china has done in the united nations, they have wielded their veto power and made it difficult for us to slap sanctions on iran, to help prevent iran from having a nuclear weapon. they have not been good players. and so i've seen russian democracy slide backwards. as long as putin is there, and it's really a shame because i think the russian people really want democracy. and i think putin is trying to be like the old communist leaders that we all remember, khr
.s. let's engage china and russia and south korea and special envoys and philanthropic groups, not just the government. this is why i consider myself a citizen and trying to do some good. >> we appreciate your efforts. we appreciate your time with us. you make a lot of sense, governor. thank you very much for your time with us. we look forward to seeing you again. >> thank you, alex. >>> west coast headlines are next with something in the air in salt lake city that future mothers are going to want to avoid. we have that warning next. >>> plus, the meteor in russia is being compared to one of the most traumatic world events ever. male announcer ] waiting, waiting... feel like you're growing older... waiting to look younger? don't wait. [ female announcer ] get younger looking skin fast. with new olay regenerist micro-sculpting cream. the next generation with 2 new anti-aging ingredients. it penetrates rapidly. visible wrinkle results start day 1. and you'll see younger looking skin before you even finish one jar. ♪ new olay regenerist. the wait is over. [ slap! ] [ male announcer ] you
the reset button with russia. >> we worked hard to get the right russian word. did i get it right? >> you got it wrong. >> i got it wrong. >> reporter: in burma, she saw the painful birth of democracy. she says benghazi is her greatest regret. >> i take full responsibility. at this point what doifference does it make? >> reporter: will she run in 2016? answers only prompt more speculation. >> i have absolutely no plans to run. >> reporter: she flew 1 million miles, visited 112 countries. kicked up her heels, threw back a few drinks on the side. a month of illness grounded her at the end. >> for me, it truly is a bittersweet moment to leave this room for the last time as secretary of state. >> reporter: enter the next secretary of state. >> american foreign policy is not defined by drones and deployments alone. >> reporter: john kerry, call, distinguished, gray-haired, son of a foreign service officer. >> trying to get some daylight between me and secretary clinton, that's not going to happen here today. >> reporter: as his confirmation hearing showed, the policy is likely to remain the sa
, and that was a long, long time ago. the arsenals of the united states and russia are full of many, many nuclear weapons many, many, many times bigger than this. but this is a rough and ready nuke of the kind that it would not be hard for the iranians or the north koreans or pakistanis or others to design. and so what would happen if one of these things was popped off in downtown manhattan? well, the map shows certain assumptions about wind speed and other factors what the devastation would be, and, of course, it's worst around the ground zero, and it's slowly getting a little bit better as you go farther out. but the estimate in this scientific journal is that this relatively small nuclear device would jury about 1.6 million people and kill over 600 million people just from being -- 600,000 people. i think we need to think about these kinds of dangers because they are not going away, and as the iranian nuclear program accelerates, these are very real possibilities that we have to think very hard about. rome was brought down by barbarians. we have to be very careful that we ourselves are not bro
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 112 (some duplicates have been removed)

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